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Go Back       IAR Journal of Business Management | IAR J Bus Mng, 2021; 2(1): | Volume:2 Issue:1 ( Jan. 20, 2021 ) : 81-88
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DOI : 10.47310/iarjbm.2021.v02i01.013       Download PDF       HTML       XML

Roles of Land Management Professionals in the Actualization of Sustainable Development Goal 17 and African Union Aspirations 7


Article History

Received: 10.12.2020, Revision: 29. 12.2020, Accepted: 08. 01.2021, Published: 20. 01.2021

Author Details

Nkpite, Bari-ene Samuel1 and Kianen, Bonmene2

Authors Affiliations

1Department of Estate Management, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

2Department of Architecture, Rivers State University, Port Harcourt, Nigeria


Abstract: The study assessed land management professional’s roles in actualizing Sustainable Development Goal 17 and African Aspiration 7 in Africa. Three specific objectives and null hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. A correlational research design was adopted for the study. The sample size of 45 lecturers was drawn from the population of 60 lecturers in Faculty of Environmental Sciences through simple random sampling technique. The obtained were analyzed using mean score and chi-square, respectively. The null hypothesis was tested at X2=61.9, 4 degree of freedom and <0.05 significant level and the results were among others, knowledge inclusion, capacity development, mobilize resources, monitoring and evaluation, preparation of reports, advocacy and outreach. Also, engage the public in awareness and sensitization, strengthen and leverage impact of land development programs, promote public consensus and local ownership for land reforms, provide concerns for primary and secondary stakeholders, training and capacity building, and data collection for good land governance to the prediction of actualizing SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 in Africa. Therefore, there is a significant relationship between the roles of land management professionals and the actualization of SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 in Africa.


Keywords: Actualization, Professionals, Land Management, SDG17, African Aspiration7.

INTRODUCTION

The actualization of SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 are vital for attaining the other global SDGs and Africa Aspirations, all of which depend on securing means of implementation and forging durable partnerships for sustainable development. SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 is one among the most comprehensive goals as the means of its implementation encompasses finance, information and communication technology, capacity-building, international trade and data monitoring and evaluation (Ajiye, 2014). The SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 can only be actualized with global and regional partnership and cooperation as global assistance remains below target. While land management crises brought on by conflict or natural disasters continue to demand more financial resources and aids. Many African countries also require land management assistance to encourage growth and investment.

UN Goal 17 which is partnerships for the goals seeks to “strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development" (SDIA, 2014). Increasing international cooperation is seen as vital to achieving each of the 16 previous goals. Goal 17 is included to assure that countries and organizations cooperate instead of compete. Developing multi-stakeholder partnerships to share knowledge, expertise, technology, and financial support is seen as critical to overall success of the SDGs. The goal encompasses improving north–south and South-South cooperation, and public-private partnerships which involve civil societies are specifically mentioned (Sustainable Development in Action (SDIA, 2013).

AU Agenda 2063 seeks to deliver on a set of seven aspirations each with its own set of goals which if achieved will move Africa closer to achieving its vision for the year 2063. The Aspiration seven (7) reflect our desire for shared prosperity and well-being, for unity and integration, for a continent of free citizens and expanded horizons, where the full potential of women and youth are realised, and with freedom from fear, disease and want. Africa mostly require more interconnected than ever improve access to technology and knowledge as an important way to share ideas that will foster innovation among land management professionals (Adeyeri, 2014). However, coordinating these sustainable development policies on land management will help land professionals in developing countries to manage land resources, promoting land investment as well pay their debt for the least developed; which is vital for sustainable growth and development in land management profession. The goal 17 and aspiration 7 aim to enhance global and regional cooperation supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international professional land management will help developing countries increase knowledge in all part of actualizing universal ruled-based and equitable investment system by land management professionals that is fair and open to benefit all (UN, 2014).

These are links between SDG17 and AU aspiration 7 that contains a broad range of targets and indicators that will be applicable in land management profession. The recurring broad range of targets and indicators in this study requires turning land management profession into genuinely durable and long-term sustainability to affect the broader structure of economical land management governance. To this extent, the study tends to examine the complex relationships between the roles of land management professionals actualizing SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 targets by the year 2025; as to policy papers and analysis on land management related means of actualizing partnerships for sustainable development in Africa.

Aim and Objectives of the Study:

This study focused on the role of land management professionals in actualizing SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7targets by the year 2025 in Africa. The specific objectives of the study are to:

  1. Ascertain the purposes for partnerships in actualizing SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7

  2. Identify the land management systems and processes to be managed in actualizing SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7

  3. Examine the roles of land management professionals in actualizing SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7.

  4. Suggest strategies on how Africa can actualize SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 by the year 2025.

Hypothesis of the Study: The hypothesis is stated below.

Ho: There is no significant impact of the land management professional’s roles in actualizing SDG17 and African aspiration 7 in Africa by the year 2025.

Hi: There is no significant impact of the land management professional’s roles in actualizing SDG17 and African aspiration 7 in Africa by the year 2025.

LITERATURE REVIEW

SDG 17; Partnerships for the Goals: Sustainable development goal 17 is a universal call to action in one area that affect the outcomes of other goals developing a balance of social, economic and environmental sustainability. The SDG 17 is designed to bring the world to several life changes needed to reach the ambitious targets (UN, 2017). Strengthening the means of implementation and revitalization of the global partnership for sustainable development works together to strengthened the inclusivity, trust and innovation in the way that land management professionals uses to address the world’s sustainable development efforts (Kar and Spanjers, 2015). It works to bring the resources of national governments, independent non-profit organizations, and private sectors to bear on the world land management system.

Strengthening the means of Implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 17:

The global partnership seeks to map data gaps at a national level, the channel funding to strengthen those systems (Kar and Spanjers, 2015). Thus, the partnership aims to bring the best data, analytical skills and ideas to solve data problems from using satellites capture to monitor agriculture efforts, to citizen engagement tools to understand sanitation requirements in villages in remote parts of the world (UN, 2017). It works to ensure that governments are given the tools they need to ensure they leave no-one behind in these development efforts (Payne, 2016).

Targets 17.16 and 17.17 stress the importance of partnerships and the contributions they can make to sustainable development. Studies has established that the advantages of sustainable development partnerships include managing complexity (Visseren-Hamakers, 2013); filling governance gaps where governments are unable or unwilling to act (Visseren-Hamakers et al., 2011, Visseren-Hamakers and Glasbergen 2006, Von Moltke 2002); addressing deficits in regulation, participation and implementation (Biermann et al., 2007); and regularizing interactions, including placing previously informal interactions on a more formal, perhaps legal, footing (Visseren-Hamakers et al., 2012).

There is nothing inherently sustainable about partnerships, according to Arévalo and Ros-Tonen (2009) partnerships are discursive battlefields that reflect power imbalances among actors grappling with different values and principles. Some partnerships may promote sustainable practices, others may not. On the part of Andonova and Levy (2003), the popularity of partnerships as a form of governance that originates from the disengagement for sustainable development of public authorities who have ‘franchised’ environmental governance to other actors. For instance, the initiative on financing Paramaribo Initiative according to Paramaribo Initiative (2008) was because stakeholders have different levels of power, and governments must establish the rules governing partnerships to ensure that the interests of weaker stakeholders, such as Indigenous communities and small enterprises, are equitably represented. Partnerships that include global, regional, public-private partnerships and local communities are essential for achieving the SDGs (SDIA 2013, 2015, CCAFS 2017).

As to be discussed, a number of land management partnerships can help achieve the SDG targets on strengthening the means of implementation (Section 17.2), and the partnerships for land rights, which supports a range of national-level professional partnerships with investment models, for example, on sustainable urban development as part of the commitments (Section 17.4). This section considers some of the further roles partnerships can play to promote the SDGs, examining three global partnerships, three regional partnerships and one public-private partnership.

Africa Aspiration7; Strong and Influential Global Partner: Aspiration7 with Africa as a strong and influential global partner has two goals; Africa as a major partner in global affairs Africa and taking full responsibility for financing her development with fine priority area.

Review of AU Aspiration 7 Targets of Agenda 2063 by the Year 2025: AU Aspiration 7 as

stated; Africa shall be a strong, united, resilient, peaceful and influential global player and partner with a significant role in world affairs. The importance of African unity and solidarity is affirmed in the face of continued external interference including, attempts to divide the continent and undue pressures and sanctions on some countries. As aspire by Agenda 2063 that Africa shall be (AUC, 2015):

  • A major social, political and economic force in the world, with her rightful share of the global commons (land, oceans and space);

  • An active and equal participant in global affairs, multilateral institutions, and a driver for peaceful co-existence, tolerance and a sustainable just world; and

  • Fully capable and have the means to finance her development.

It implies that Africa will take her rightful place in the political, security, economic, and social systems of global governance towards the realization of its renaissance, establishing Africa as a leading continent. Africa will undertake to continue the global struggle against all forms of exploitation, racism and discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerances; to advance international cooperation that promotes and defends Africa’s interests, that is mutually beneficial and aligned to our Pan-African’s vision; to continue to speak with one voice and act collectively to promote our common interests and positions in the international arena (CCAFS, 2017).

Africa shall continue to advocate for the reform of the United Nations and other international institutions, with particular reference to the UN Security Council, in order to correct the historical injustice of Africa not being represented on the Council by a permanent seat (African Union Commission, 2015). Africa is on an upward trend and seeks mutually beneficial relations and partnerships with other regions and continents (Ogbuigwe, 2018). It, therefore, looks at the nature of partnerships with a view to rationalizing them and enhancing the benefits to its transformation and integration efforts (Payne. 2016). This shall be done by strengthening common perspectives on partnerships on priorities and views on global matters.

Responsibilities of Land Management Professionals to the Society: Interest in land right have become so intense given the extent to which competition for land is intensified; inevitably dominate public discourse and media attention globally (Ogbuigwe, 2018). It is requiring from land management professionals to make the land market workable for the society, not the other way round. Land and housing markets are an excellent means for achieving goal 17 since government exert considerable direct and indirect influence over land prices as they justified in claiming a reasonable proportion of surplus land generated for allocation in public interest (Payne, 2016). However, vested interest inhabits the professional adoption and implementation of goal 17 at the speed and scale of partnership needed (Ogbuigwe, 2018). According to Payne (2016), the progress of land management requires that professional use the best option and awareness to address vested interest to realize change or identify support and evidence that carried weight. However, it’s essential that professionals retain their intellectual independence and identify any options available at a given time and place when the scope of change is limited. This requires the international community support as clearly stated by SDG17. Furthermore, professionals need to address inequality in land distribution as a new system of regulating land markets that harness the strength of putting resources to efficient use in generating growth with the regulatory responsibilities of the state to protect the public interest (Ogbuigwe, 2018). These provided an ideal forum for promoting better implementation approaches in SDG17.

Challenges Faced by Land Management Professionals: Urbanization has been the engine of economic development though conventional methods of managing urban growth (AU/ AUC/ AFDB, 2010); and land management profession have failed. The challenges to meet the needs of predominantly low-income migrants and the indigenous urban populations has been identified; that security of tenure has been a major challenge to land management professionals to achieve SDG17 in the area of (African Union Commission, 2017);

  • Conflict over land as common form of litigation in many African countries impeded social and economic development.

  • Claims that property ownership that can help lift people out of poverty have been grossly exaggerated and have not only raised land prices to levels that many cannot hope to afford, but have rendered many vulnerable to market driven displacement. So government needs to promote a range of tenure options that are sustainable to meet diverse needs.

  • Regulatory barriers; planning standards, regulations and administrative procedures to register develop and transfer land exert considerable influence over the equity and efficiency of land markets.

Some of these norm formulated by land management professionals as believe are not sustainable, but have proven inappropriate to the needs of many African countries. According to Ogbuigwe (2018), the innovative approaches to improved land management and governance need to be more widely adopted through partnerships as well as the innovative approaches to balance the interest of public and private sectors have generated much innovative partnership as private interest increase, public influence is weakening with land commercialization. Land management needs to be based on an assessment of political and economic context that determines outcomes (Payne, 2016).

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The study adopted a correlational research design method to test the relationship between SDG17, African aspiration and the roles of land management professionals. This study area is Rivers State University and particularly Faculty of Environmental Sciences of the University in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The study was conducted among the Lecturers Faculty of Environmental Sciences with vast knowledge on SDGs 2030 and Agenda 2063, and also as land management professionals in the built environment. In order for the objectives of this study to be achieved, the study population on the ‘roles of land management professionals in actualizing SDG17 and African Aspiration 7’; the population comprises of sixty (60) lecturers of six (6) Departments in Faculty of Environmental Sciences. A sample size of 45 lecturers was randomly selected from a population of 60 lecturers of the departments; Architecture, Estate Management, Environmental Management, Surveying and Geomatics, Quantity Surveying and Urban and Regional Planning that engages in the study. The primary source of data was collected through pilot survey and structured questionnaires administered on identified land management professionals in the study. The simple random sampling technique was utilized in selection of 45 lecturers; Architecture (8), Estate Management (8), Environmental Management (3), Surveying and Geomatics (8), Quantity Surveying (8) and Urban and Regional Planning (10) representing 75% response rate. The study also intended to consolidate secondary data with available documents on studies: roles of land management professionals with emphasis on results to achieve SDG17 and Agenda 2063 by the year 2025. Data collected was quantitatively analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tools to established relationship between the independent and dependent variables.

RESULTS AND DATA PRESENTATION

Reasons for Partnerships in SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7: Table 1 shows reasons for

partnerships of SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 actualization. The table clearly indicates that more than half of the respondents rated ‘financing land development’, ‘capacity building’, information and communication’ and ‘monitoring and evaluation ‘with weighted sums of .15, 3.13, 3.11 and 3.09 respectively. Table 1 further shows that more than average (.3.00) of the respondents rated ‘accountability’ and ‘system issues with bilateral development’, ‘trade/ investment’ and ‘improve data collection system’ as the partnership reasons identified for SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 actualization by 2063 and 2030 respectively.

Table 1: Reasons for Partnerships (SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7)

Reasons for Partnerships

Weight: N = 45


RII

Rank










5

4

3

2

1










Monitoring & Evaluation

10

9

9

9

8

139

3.09

0.64

4th










Information &communication technology

9

9

12

8

7

140

3.11

0.65

3rd










Capacity building

8

8

15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd










Trade/investment

10

7

11

8

9

136

3.02

0.61

7th










System issues with bilateral development

10

9

8

8

10

137

3.04

0.62

6th










Improve data collection system

9

9

9

9

9

135

3.00

0.60

8th










Finance land development

10

9

10

9

7

142

3.15

0.67

1st










Accountability

10

9

10

7

8

138

3.07

0.63

5th










Legend: 1 = Strongly Disagreed, 2 = Disagreed, 3 = Undecided, 4 = Agreed and 5 = Strongly Agreed.



15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd

Decision: <3.00 = Disagreed, > 3.00 = Agreed










Source: Author’s Investigation, 2020

Land Management Systems and Processes to Actualized SDG 17 and African Aspiration7

Table 2 described land management systems and processes to be done by the land management professionals in actualized SDG 17 and African Aspiration7. It implies that these systems are interrelated as the actual economic and physical use of land and properties influence land value. Land value is also influenced by the possible future use of land as determine through zoning, land use planning regulations and permits granting processes. And the land use planning and policies will, of course, determine and regulate future land development.

Table 2: Land Management Systems and Processes to Actualized SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7

Systems

Processes

Land Tenure

The allocation and security of rights in lands, the legal surveys to determine parcel boundaries; the transfer of property or use from one party to another through sale or lease; and the management and adjudication of doubts and disputes regarding rights and parcel boundaries

Land Value

The assessment of the value of land and properties; the gathering of revenues through taxation; and the management and adjudication of land valuation and taxation disputes.

Land Use

The control of land use regulations at national, regional and local levels; the enforcement land use regulations; and the management and adjudication of land use conflicts.

Land Development

The building of new physical infrastructure; the implementation of construction planning and change of land use through planning permission and granting of permits.

Source: Author’s Investigation, 2020

Land Management Roles Professionals in Actualizing SDG 17 and AfricanAspiration7:

Table 3 shows the roles of land management professionals in actualizing SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7. The table clearly revealed that more than half of the respondents agreed with the roles of land management professionals in actualizing SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7 include knowledge inclusion with a mean score of 3.15, capacity development (3.13), mobilize resources, monitoring and evaluation (3.11) respectively, preparation of reports (3.09), Advocacy and Outreach (3.07). It implies that roles of land management professionals in actualizing SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7 are knowledge inclusion, capacity development, mobilize resources, monitoring and evaluation, preparation of reports, advocacy and outreach.

Table 3: Roles of Land Management Professionals in Actualizing SDG 17 and African- Aspiration 7

Roles of Land Management Professionals

Weight: N = 45


RII

Rank

5

4

3

2

1

Knowledge Inclusion

10

9

10

9

7

142

3.15

0.67

1st

Advocacy and Outreach

10

9

10

7

8

138

3.07

0.63

5th

Capacity development

8

8

15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd

Mobilize resources

10

9

9

9

8

139

3.09

0.64

4th

Preparation of Reports

9

9

12

8

7

140

3.11

0.65

3rd

Monitoring & evaluation

8

8

15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd

Legend: 1 = Strongly Disagreed, 2 = Disagreed, 3 = Undecided, 4 = Agreed and 5 = Strongly Agreed.

Decision: <3.00 = Disagreed, > 3.00 = Agreed

Source: Author’s Investigation, 2020

Strategies on How Africa can Actualize SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7: It was gathered from the data based on Table 4 that most of the respondents agree with the strategies on how African can actualized SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 by the year 2025. As shown in Table 3, it revealed that more than average (>3.00) of the respondents agree with service delivery, mobilizing private sector involvement, monitoring and evaluation, addressing inadequate and unreliable data system, organizing workshop for learning and sharing of experience, training and re-training and capacity building, fighting corruption, creating awareness and empowerment as the strategies that would be put in place as to actualized SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 in Africa.

Table 4: Strategies on How Africa can Actualize SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7

Strategies Actualized

Weight: N = 45


RII

Rank

5

4

3

2

1

Service Delivery

10

7

11

8

9

136

3.02

0.61

7th

Mobilize Private Sector

10

9

8

8

10

137

3.04

0.62

6th

Monitoring and Evaluation

7

7

8

8

8

111

2.47

0.49

9th

Address inadequate and unreliable data system

10

9

10

9

7

142

3.15

0.67

1st

Organize workshop for learning and sharing of experience

10

9

10

7

8

138

3.07

0.63

5th

Training, re-training and capacity building

8

8

15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd

Fighting of Corruption

10

9

9

9

8

139

3.09

0.64

4th

Creating Awareness

9

9

12

8

7

140

3.11

0.65

3rd

Empowerment

8

8

15

7

7

141

3.13

0.66

2nd

Accountability

9

9

9

9

9

135

3.00

0.60

8th

Legend: 1 = Strongly Disagreed, 2 = Disagreed, 3 = Undecided, 4 = Agreed and 5 = Strongly Agreed.

Decision: <3.00 = Disagreed, > 3.00 = Agreed

Source: Author’s Investigation, 2020.

Hypothesis Testing

The hypothesis is re-stated below:

Ho: There is no significant impact of the land management professional’s roles in actualizing SDG17 and African aspiration 7 in Africa by the year 2025.

Table 5: I am Optimistic about the Roles of Land Management Professionals in Actualizing SDG17 and African- Aspiration 7.

Variations

Observed

Expected

Df

X2

Sig.

Strongly Agree

20

10

4

61.9*

0.00

Agree

14

10

Undecided

5

10

Disagree

4

10

Strongly Disagree

2

10

Source: Source: Author’s Investigation, 2020

The chi-square statistical tool as revealed, indicates that most respondents believed that the roles played by the land management professionals affect the actualization of SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 at X2=61.9, 4 degree of freedom and <0.05 significant level.

DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS

Reasons for Partnerships in SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7:

The SDG17 implementation exist to provide partnership to finance development projects, information and communications technology, capacity building, trade investment, bilateral development partners in respect of system issues, data collection, monitoring and evaluation, including accountability as established in the study. Similarly, AU Aspiration7 implementation plan puts Africa in partnership with global affairs and peaceful co-existence and financing her development goals through partnerships, fiscal systems and public sector revenue, capital markets, development assistance are linking the rural and the urban areas. It implies that there are links between AU Agenda 2063 Aspiration 7 and SDG17. AU aspiration 7 and SDG17 is seen as one universal area that calls for action as a balance to social, economic and environmental sustainability. As stated in all declaration on land issues and challenges (AUC 2017); actualizing the African Aspiration7 and SDG17 is critical to good land governance, particularly goals related to quality of life and well-being, (AU goal7). Similarly, the actualization of SDG17 is underpinned by good land governance, especially goals related to: industrialization, innovation and infrastructure (SDG9), sustainable cities, (SDG11), climate action (SDG13), life below water (SDG14), life on land (SDG15), peace justice and strong institution (SDG16). This involves all-inclusive economic growth to end poverty, hunger, gender equality and productive employment. The key actions and milestone in this regard include aligning the role of land management professionals to land investment plan targets by 2025. Key targets and indicators associated with AU Agenda 2063 (to be achieved by 2063) and SDGS (to be achieved by 2030) include land governance targets and indicators in the realms of equitable access to land and security of land rights for the vulnerable groups.

Land Management Systems and Processes to Actualized SDG 17 and African Aspiration7

The study revealed that land management activities perform by land management professionals rely on some form of land administration infrastructure that permits the complex range of rights, restriction and responsibilities in land to be identified and managed. It shows that appropriate land administration systems form the bases for sound land management towards economic, social and environmental sustainability. As a result, the land administration infrastructure will ensure land tenure, land value, land use and land development. And the process of policies adjustment that is based on constant monitoring with land administration and land management activities performed by land management professionals will change the needs of society. These activities would be based on:

  1. Overall Land Policy;

  • Determining values, objectives and legal framework in relation to management of land as a legal, and physical object.

  • Basis for building sound land administration infrastructures.

  1. Cadastral Systems;

  • Identification of land parcels and securing land rights.

  • Facilitate land registration, land valuation and land use control.

  • Underpin sound land administration.

  1. Land Administrative Systems;

  • Administration of land tenure, land value, land use and land development.

  • Facilitate efficient land markets and effective land-use management.

  • Underpin sound land management.

  1. Land Management;

  • Management of processes by which land resources are put into good effect.

  • Facilitate economic, social and environmental sustainability.

  • Underpin and implement sound land policies.

Land Management Professionals Roles in Actualizing SDG 17 and African Aspiration 7:

The study discovered that land management professionals have important roles to play in the actualization of SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 in Africa. The roles plays are summarized as follows.

  • Engage the general public in awareness and sensitization campaign with their broad networks on SDGs and AU Aspirations as it relates to land management.

  • Strengthen and leverage impact of land development programs by providing local knowledge, identifying potential risks, targeting assistance, and expanding reach, particularly at the community level.

  • Promote public consensus and local ownership for land reforms and for national poverty reduction and development strategies creating knowledge-sharing networks, building common ground for understanding, encouraging public-private cooperation, and sometimes even diffusing tensions.

  • Provide concerns for primary and secondary stakeholders, particularly the poor and marginalized vulnerable, and help ensure that their views are factored into policy and program decisions.

  • Monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the SDG 17 on yearly basis, and strengthening by ensuring fight against corruption.

  • Training platform supporting appropriate training and capacity building programmes, needed to delivery professional inputs with other stakeholders in order to enhance their productivity and efficiency in implementing SDGs programmes and projects.

  • Support data collection for good land governance.

It should be noted that some form of land policies formulated by land management professionals are not sustainable, but have proven inappropriate to the needs of many African countries. The innovative approaches to improved land management and governance need to be more widely adopted through partnerships. Innovative approaches to balance the interest of public and private sectors have generated much innovative partnership as private interest increase, public influence is weakening with land commercialization. Land management needs to be based on an assessment of political and economic context that determines outcomes.

Strategies on How Africa can Actualize SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7:

The findings show that land management professionals can adopt these strategies in achieving SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7. They are:

  • Service delivery towards achieving SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7

  • Mobilizing private sector involvement

  • Monitoring and evaluation

  • Issue of inadequate and unreliable data system on land management

  • Organize workshop for cross learning and sharing of experience among practitioners

  • Training, re-training and capacity building of professionals

  • Fighting corruption

  • Creating awareness

  • Accountability

  • Empowerment

However, for land management professionals to be able to play their roles and with strategies identified above; there is need for a detailed land management capacity needs assessment for institutional strengthening to be carried out and training conducted to match these needs before more funds are put in for SDG specific efforts. This is to ensure transparency and efficiency in the utilization of donor funds and downward and upward accountability of land management professionals actively in the implementation of SDG 17 and Aspiration 7 of AU to specific projects and/or programmes.

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This study has highlighted some key dimensions for successful partnerships to be made, with special focus on the roles of land management professionals, which is understood to include finance, technology, capacity building, trade, and systematic issues and to be an action that should easily contribute to all 16 SDGs. However, while a focus on increasing SDG implementation may lead to some tangible gains for land management; it may simultaneously reinforce some potential contradictions among SDGs. Evidence assembled in this study provides that AU aspiration 7 and SDG17 is seen as one universal area that calls for action as a balance to social, economic and environmental sustainability. And the link between SDG 17 and AU Aspiration 7 is one among the most comprehensive goals as the means of its implementation encompasses finance, partnerships, information and communication technology, capacity-building, international trade and data monitoring. The aim of AU Aspiration 7 negates Africa as a strong and influential global partner similar to what SDG 17 aims to promote: a global partnership for sustainable development; a political economy view argues that in as much as a global partnership may be said to exist, it is one founded on neoliberal principles, such as the expansion of international trade and economic growth, with relatively limited attention to environmental conservation. This is to ensure transparency and efficiency in the utilization of donor funds and downward and upward accountability of land management professionals actively in the implementation of SDG 17 and Aspiration 7 of AU to specific projects and/or programmes. Also, it is important for land management professionals to meet from time to time to share resources, experiences, exchange information and strategize together on how best they can bolster each other’s work which is largely complimentary to land management. Mobilizing private sector involvement are needed by land management professionals as strategies for actualizing SDGs, series of sensitization need to be carried out to debunk the competition mentality in land development that is part and parcel of land management conflict in Africa. Therefore, there is a significant relationship between the roles of land management professionals and the actualization of SDG17 and African Aspiration 7 in Africa.

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